Stalking Seagull

stalking_seagull_portree_skye

This guy was lucky that the wooden pallet was there to stop this aggressive bird from taking his fish. The bird made several attempts to get at the food but each time backed off at the last minute, uncertain of how he would escape if he did get the food. All the time he was doing this, the poor tourist guy was keeping a watchful eye on his hungry stalker.

Aggressive seagulls come from people feeding them. The most aggressive I’ve ever come across were at Conwy, Wales back in 2003. where waves of brash, delinquent seagulls would literally mob you and try and snatch the food out of your hand using fly-by attacks.

It was annoying and also quite scary as the birds were quite big – probably from being so well fed. The easiest thing was to wrap up the food and dash for the car making you feel like you were in a scene from Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film ‘The Bird’s’.

More images from last month’s trip to Scotland can be found HERE

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Favourite Photo?

There is a website, for a British newspaper, that runs a regular article where a photographer picks his or her favourite photograph. While the choices made by the photographer in question can be revealing, I often think that the idea of picking ONE photo to sum up your work/talent is just asking for trouble.

The photograph above is just one of my favourite shots. I’m certainly not going to limit myself to picking just one unless I have some rabid photo fanatic, holding me hostage with a gun to my head. Then I’d have to pick one! If so the photo above would make the list.

The photograph was taken in 2003 at Beaumaris on Anglesey, North Wales. It was the classic story of walking along and behold, there was the image. The couple were taking in the view, looking over the water to the Snowdonia national park with the mountains just visible through the mist. Really the picture sums up, at least for me, what most people seek out of life – a companion to be with and to admire/share the view/experience with them. It also reminds me of the W.H Davis poem about having time to stand and stare.

I was worried that they’d move position or decide to walk further along the sea front, but they remained like that for some time, completely unaware that i’d taken their photo. Two frames of HP5 taken on a Nikon F4s fitted with an 80-200mm zoom.

The only other consideration is the telescope to the right of the couple. Is the fact that it is in an upright position relevant at all??? 🙂